Unfamiliar or improbable?

“There is a tendency in our planning to confuse the unfamiliar with the improbable” – Thomas Schelling, Harvard economist, in reference to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour Although the above quote is not at all in reference to education or technology – it nonetheless is related and important. There will inevitably be a wall in…

Individualism and Gratitude in Higher Education 

Higher education can seem somewhat individualistic. I remember one academic comparing teaching to an egg box – where we are all connected but work in individual silos. The mass individualism which may settle in some departments and schools can corrupt the culture and environment of a sector which must influence and educate. I reflect on, but…

Rule Number Six

Two Prime Ministers were sitting in a room discussing affairs of state.  Suddenly a man bursts in, apoplectic with fury, shouting and stamping and banging his fist on the desk.  The resident prime minister admonishes him: “Peter,” he says, “kindly remember Rule Number 6,” whereupon Peter is instantly restored to complete calm, apologises, and withdraws. …

Defeat yet undefeated..

We can be destroyed by catastrophe, not just materially, but morally and spiritually. Trauma can destroy our characters; poverty can destroy; insult, neglect, war all can affect and destroy character. Yet one must admire those who do not bow to humanity’s moral fragility, but insist on resilience – the inner strength and that ability to…

Differences in the male and female brain? – in regard to STEM!

The controversial speech by then Harvard President Lawrence Summers in 2005 to the US National Bureau of Economic Research, and the debate afterwards, is interesting to review. He suggested one reason there are relatively few women in top positions in science may be “issues of intrinsic aptitude.” It’s this intrinsic aptitude, which I find interesting. Summers opened his…